Scoliosis  is a medical condition in which a person's spine has a sideways curve

Scoliosis is a medical condition in which a person's spine has a sideways curve

Scoliosis

Scoliosis is an abnormal sideways curvature of the spine. It begins as a postural distortion and may become a permanent deformity. Allowed to advance, it may interfere with the lungs, heart and many other vital organs.

Three Causes

  1. Congenital genetic predisposition
  2. Habitual behavioral routines
  3. Idiopathic unknown cause

Regardless of cause, early detection can be helpful.

Obvious Clues

An alert parent may notice that a high shoulder or low hip make clothing fit poorly. Or uneven shoe wear offers a clue. Back and leg pains may develop but are often dismissed as “growing pains.”

Wait and See?

Allowed to run its course, scoliosis may often worsen. Severe cases may involve unsightly bracing or surgery that attaches steel rods, forcing the spine to straighten.

Natural Approach

A schedule of specific chiropractic adjustments may help improve the function and structure of the spine. As muscles are retrained and strengthened, posture may improve.

Bring your child in so we can discuss your concerns and explore the possibilities.

Allowed to run its course, scoliosis may often worsen. Severe cases may involve unsightly bracing or surgery that attaches steel rods, forcing the spine to straighten.

 

 
 
backpack+awareness[1].jpg

Backpack safety tips

The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) offers the following tips to help prevent the needless pain that backpack misuse could cause the students in your household.

1. Make sure your child's backpack weighs no more than 5 to 10 percent of his or her body weight. A heavier backpack will cause your child to bend forward in an attempt to support the weight on his or her back, rather than on the shoulders, by the straps.

2. The backpack should never hang more than four inches below the waistline. A backpack that hangs too low increases the weight on the shoulders, causing your child to lean forward when walking.

3. A backpack with individualized compartments helps in positioning the contents most effectively. Make sure that pointy or bulky objects are packed away from the area that will rest on your child's back.

4. Bigger is not necessarily better. The more room there is in a backpack, the more your child will carry-and the heavier the backpack will be.

5. Urge your child to wear both shoulder straps. Lugging the backpack around by one strap can cause the disproportionate shift of weight to one side, leading to neck and muscle spasms, as well as low-back pain.

6. Wide, padded straps are very important. Non-padded straps are uncomfortable, and can dig into your child's shoulders.

7. The shoulder straps should be adjustable so the backpack can be fitted to your child's body. Straps that are too loose can cause the backpack to dangle uncomfortably and cause spinal misalignment and pain.

8. If the backpack is still too heavy, talk to your child's teacher. Ask if your child could leave the heaviest books at school, and bring home only lighter hand-out materials or workbooks.

9. Although the use of rollerpacks - or backpacks on wheels - has become popular in recent years, ACA is now recommending that they be used cautiously and on a limited basis by only those students who are not physically able to carry a backpack. Some school districts have begun banning the use of rollerpacks because they clutter hallways, resulting in dangerous trips and falls.

If you child is complaining about shoulder, neck or back pain or you notice that your child is leaning forward due to a heavy backpack, call our office for a FREE consultation today.

Don't wait for it to get worse!